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Where Have All The Fun Times Gone?

Dare to Feel Happy in the Midst of Trying Circumstances
Article Text: What do you think of, when you hear the word FUN?
Who has TIME for FUN? Fun is the reward for getting all your work done, and there’s always more work to be done. Does the guilt of work not done overshadow your ability to have fun? Do children appear to feel guilty about having fun? NO! The average preschool child laughs over 400 times a day, the average adult laughs 15. If you watch a child, you will soon notice that there is no separation between work and play.

Our parents are to blame!

Karyn Ruth White, in her book with Jay Arthur, “Your Seventh Sense,” reminds us that as we were growing up, our parents systematically taught us that work and play are two separate things and that play cannot occur until the work is done. Remember hearing, “Finish your homework/chores and then you can go out to play? Shh… settle down! That’s not funny! Wipe that silly grin off your face right now! Enough monkey business! There’s a time and place and this is not the time!”

No room left for fun?

Do you know someone so serious about life, they have no room left for fun? I remember a time when I fell into that category. When I was 33, an auto accident left me facing the challenges of living with a brain injury. Because I was so focused on rehab, the hilarious situations I found myself in day after day were not even remotely funny to me. My husband asked me, “Are you going to allow your circumstances to ruin every day?”

Suddenly, I realized feeling happy and having fun were rewards I had set aside until I completed the hard work of restoring my health and abilities, my life!

Is it possible to feel happy and have fun in the midst of your circumstances?

YES! Humor can be a tremendous resource in reducing frustration, managing stress, and overcoming adversity. Learning to see the humor in situations and learning to laugh at yourself can lighten any load and brighten every day. Work is easier when mixed with laughter and FUN.

Whatever you look for, you will find!

If it’s trouble you are looking for, trouble will find you. If you want to have a great day, look for the positives. If you want to have a miserable day, look for the negatives. If you want to see the humor in ordinary, everyday life — all you have to do is start looking for it.

Where have all the fun times gone?

Everyday we miss opportunities to laugh and have fun. My brain injury brought me challenges and heartache that I did not ask for. HOWEVER, my brain injury rehab taught me how to feel happy in the midst of my circumstances and how to look for and enjoy the humor that everyday life surrounds us with each and every day.

Look for the humor in everyday life, and you will always have plenty of fun times!

Article Signature:
Lois McElravy, Lessons from Lois, works with individuals and organizations who want to learn how to use the power of humor and the magic of laughter to handle the demands and pressures of work and home, adjust to constant change, deal with difficult people, cope with the unpredictable swift pace of life, product positive outcomes and have more fun.

Learning to laugh and “hangin’ on with humor” rescued Lois from the distress and despair surrounding her daily life, and initiated her recovery from a brain injury. Lois’ keynotes and trainings entertain, inspire and stimulate audiences to examine their own response to challenge and adversity. Hilarious personal stories, “Lessons from Lois” impart life-changing insights and equip participants with humor strategies and practical solutions to overcome the seriousness of their life challenges and feel happy.

Her universal message renews hope and motivates others to consistently do small things so they can achieve amazing results one day at a time.

©2012 Lois McElravy, Lessons from Lois – Permission to reprint or repost this article is granted by including the above byline and Lois’ contact information. http://www.lessonsfromlois.com